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Assessors claim dodgy EPCs ignored

Assessors continue to claim that accreditation bodies ignore requests to take action when inaccurate EPCs are drawn to their attention.

After continuing concern from assessors about the number of ‘seriously inaccurate’ certificates lodged in support of installers’ ECO claims, EAM approached accreditation bodies for their views on this issue.

In response we received statements from three accreditation bodies.

Elmhurst said that it investigated whenever proven inaccurate EPCs were drawn to its attention.

Quidos said that DCLG was obstructing AB’s ability to audit to deal with the problem, but that Quidos came across few instances anyway.

Stroma said that it had not initially received our email due to a technical issue on its system, but that it investigated all claims of inaccurate EPCs in full.

The statements from all three accreditation bodies are given in full below.

There is no suggestion that all of these accreditation bodies have been accused by assessors of ignoring complaints, but both Elmhurst and Stroma have been named in a recent thread on this topic on the LinkedIn Domestic Energy Assessors group, with assessors claiming they have often contacted both ABs on this issue without action.

This is an issue which is believed by many assessors to be related especially to EPCs lodged by DEAs employed by ECO installers.  There are no statistics available on exactly how many lodged EPCs are allegedly inaccurate, but there are many reports of assessors coming across them.

Sue Coleman (right), chair of West Country assessors’ organisation DCHI, said: “This is a topic which has frequently come up for discussion amongst our members, and yes, that frustration has been felt as we often come across inaccurate EPCs.

“We have been made aware that the accreditation bodies will take complaints from assessors, but whether they result in any action being taken is not known.  It is possible that the accreditation bodies are keeping this a little quiet as there is a potential flood gate that could open.”

Glen Neville (below), President of Midlands assessors’ organisation MEP, said his members were also concerned about the issue, and he believed that Government must take responsibility as well as accreditation bodies.

He told EAM: “This subject has often come up during MEP meetings over the years. Fellow members reporting faulty EPCs to the respective ABs with no response continues to be an open sore within our profession.

“I trust that the long awaited re-writing of the Scheme Operating Requirements will clarify the situation and give clear instructions to ABs as to what form any review and remedial action should take in all cases where a complaint has been received.

“I hope that this article is monitored by DCLG, as they must take full responsibility for the fact that this situation has been on-going since EPCs were first carried out in England and Wales.”

Stroma Technical Manager Andy Parkin said: “We investigate all claims of inaccurate EPCs in full in line with Scheme Operating Requirements and look to take appropriate action where necessary.

“Stroma Certification takes our responsibilities as a certification body and to our members very seriously. We follow a strict and thorough audit procedure for EPCs and will fully investigate any concerns raised about the accuracy of particular lodgements.

“We have an active role on industry panels and committees which influence policy and SORs and it is our ongoing commitment to seek change for the betterment of the industry.”

Martyn Reed, Managing Director of accreditation body Elmhurst Energy, said: “Elmhurst has a key role in maintaining quality EPCs to ensure that stakeholders, including householders and Government can rely on the data they present and the recommendations made.

“Where members of any accreditation body identify an Elmhurst EPC that they believe to be wrong, and have evidence to support that belief, then Elmhurst will register the matter and call the EPC for audit.

“Elmhurst members who fail to prove the accuracy of the EPC will be dealt with under our normal disciplinary processes, which may include their membership being revoked.”

Philip Salaman, Managing Director of Quidos, said: “It’s a fine balance between ensuring good quality amongst all assessors, and hence treating all to the same amount of scrutiny – and the use of intelligent QA processes.

“At the moment we are obliged to use the former, and until our pressure on DCLG comes to anything we will be prevented from using intelligent result based auditing techniques.

“The good news is that Quidos don’t have many of these assessors who manipulate the rules, probably because they are aware of our tough stance on quality.”

The issue of EPC and GDAR accuracy surfaced officially as long ago as December 2014 when DECC published its Green Deal Mystery Shopper report – see Shock Report Reveals GDAR Problems – which assessor organisations said was the result of their views not being listened to – see Assessors Blame Govt for GDAR Problems

We first raised the issue of possible fraud 18 months ago – see Why are so many EPCs still inaccurate? – after being told by assessors about their concerns.

We were then contacted by Northumbrian DEA and trainer Taylor Boutin who carried out internal auditing for several large companies, and found that some staff were producing falsified EPCs on an industrial scale – see ‘Crooked DEAs Have Falsified EPCs’

Following this we received many more comments from concerned assessors who had come across dodgy EPCs – see ‘Crooked DEAs’ : Assessors Speak Out

In September 2015 DCLG launched a bid to stamp out fraud in the energy assessment industry by proposing to revise the Scheme Operating Requirements with which ABs have to comply – see DCLG bid to stamp out fraud – and assessor organisations were given an opportunity to submit their proposals.

A key proposal made by assessor organisations was that accreditation bodies must take action when complaints are made to them by assessors about inaccurate EPCs, but based on assessors comments, more than a year on it appears that this is still not happening, according to assessors.

Source: Energy assessor magazine

Christmas opening hours

Christmas opening hours

The Quidos offices will be closed from:

Thursday 22nd December 2016 until Monday 2nd January 2017.

The office will be open as usual from Tuesday 3rd January 2017.

All technical support queries should be directed to the Quidos Support Log:

http://support.quidos.co.uk or email support@quidos.co.uk.

Our support team will be checking this throughout the Christmas period to ensure that assessors’ queries are answered.

All auditing deadlines will be adjusted for the Christmas Bank Holiday days – more details will be sent nearer the time.

Merry Christmas, and a happy and prosperous new year from everyone at Quidos.

 

 

New report shows uptick in post-Brexit efficiency investment

Large-scale energy efficiency projects have become more popular with businesses post-Brexit, according to the latest Energy Efficiency Trends report from EEVS Insight.

The quarterly report, supported by Bloomberg New Finance, finds that over half of respondents are undertaking projects over £100,000, rising from 27 per cent in the first quarter of 2016.

Suppliers have also seen a significant increase in orders in the third quarter of this year, with none having reported any £100,000 orders in quarter two of 2016.

High efficiency lighting retained the top spot in terms of investment in individual technologies, however Building and Energy Management Systems (BEMS) were used within 43 per cent of the projects undertaken by consumer-side respondents in the last six months.

Confidence in the government’s management of energy efficiency policy has dropped to its lowest level since the survey began, which the study indicates could be influenced by a recent decline in sentiment regarding the government’s management of the wider economy.

Ian Jeffries, Director of Advisory Services at EEVS, states that in the run up to the Brexit vote, uncertainty and a prudent ‘wait-and-see’ attitude contributed to particularly low levels of consumer spending within the sector.

“Today, in a post-Brexit environment, uncertainty in relation to the economic impacts of Brexit look to have precipitated an increase in spend,” he said.

“In the short term, this will of course be tremendous news for suppliers, but such volatility does point to the prospect of bumpy ride in the months and years to come as the political and economic realities of implementing a form of Brexit crystallise within the energy efficiency marketplace.”

Payback expectations have continued to loosen, with the report estimating an average (median) reported payback of almost 4 years. Quarter three of this year saw the largest volume of projects within the 3-5 year payback banding. By contrast shorter payback projects of up to three years continued to contract.

Amongst energy efficiency suppliers responding to the survey, supply-side industry confidence recovered slightly from the previous quarter but remains in negative territory.

The market monitor, which combines trends in supplier order books, staffing levels, sales prices and government action, improved from -38 to -14 points, which the paper suggests could indicate a relaxation from the initial shock of the Brexit vote.

Richard Singleton, Group Strategic Assets Director at Bellrock, commented: “Brexit has undoubtedly created uncertainty.  As a provider of property and facilities management services we are seeing a renewed focus on cost savings, particularly for those organisations affected by the adverse exchange rates.

“Energy is one area where organisations can reduce overhead costs and deliver straight to the bottom line.”

Source: Energyzine

Building stock research unveils massive efficiency potential

An official survey of the UK’s non-domestic building stock has uncovered significant potential for energy efficiency technologies, which could save owners or tenants as much as £1.3bn each year.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy published its Building Energy Efficiency Survey results earlier this week, based on the 2014 to 2015 non-domestic building stock.

The survey found that the total stock in England and Wales, which comprised of more than 1.8 million buildings, consumed a total of 161,060GWh of energy each year. Of that figure, 53 per cent (84,820GWh) was electrical and the rest non-electrical.

Crucially BEIS found that as much as 63,160GWh of that total energy consumption could have been avoided through the adoption of energy efficiency technologies. More than a third of those potential savings could also have been abated through measures with payback periods of three years or less, representing possible bill savings of £1.3bn.

Measures with the greatest potential savings were carbon and energy management systems, lighting replacement and control, and building services instrumentation and control measures which combined represented more than half of the total savings potential.

This tallies with the most common end uses of energy, which included space heating, internal lighting, catering and cooled storage, which were responsible for 70 per cent of energy consumption. Electrical energy was commonly used to power internal lighting, cooled storage and ICT equipment.

But while the potential for efficiency savings was undoubted, a large number of barriers were also identified by those who participated in the survey. Economic barriers were the most prevalent, including restricted access to capital, perceived hidden costs within investments and external risks.

A number of organisational barriers were also referenced. Complex chains of decision making was a barrier mentioned frequently, corresponding with the results of similar surveys which have found that decision making processes have prohibited energy efficiency investments from going ahead in a number of businesses.

Source: Energy assessor magazine

New report shows big fall in Europe’s energy consumption

The European Commission’s Joint Research Centre has published the record of energy consumption reductions across Europe between 2000 and 2014. It reveals that final energy consumption across the 28 countries fell substantially.

Overall, consumption went down from 1,133 million tonnes of oil equivalent (mtoe) to just 1,061mtoe. As a result, the EU’s formal target – of cutting back to 1,086mtoe by 2020 – has been beaten six years early.

Among the most successful at achieving reductions was the UK. Energy consumption has dropped by 15.5 per cent, down to 129.8mtoe This is far lower than 50 years ago whilst living standards, as measured by gross domestic product, have soared up to three times higher.

This official report also highlights energy consumption trends across each sector. During this century, European private sector industries have led the way, delivering a 17.6 per cent reduction. Among the most successful has been the textiles industry, where final energy consumption, due largely to enhanced sustainable practices, has fallen by 60 per cent.

The residential sector has slashed consumption by just under 10 per cent. However different trends have been recorded in the transport sector (up 2.2 per cent overall, but with aviation consumption up 14.8 per cent);and in the commercial and services sector, where an alarming 16 per cent increase in energy consumption between 2000 and 2014 has been recorded.

For fifty years, continuous improvements in the energy efficiency of technologies and buildings have led the most successful revolution in improving security and resilience in the entire energy market. Given that its consumption reduction levels have fallen more than any other large European country, it is disappointing that the present UK government has made no statement whatsoever at any level regarding these successful figures. It is also indicative of the current levels of official indifference to energy efficiency.

Source: Energyzine

Building stock research unveils massive efficiency potential

An official survey of the UK’s non-domestic building stock has uncovered significant potential for energy efficiency technologies, which could save owners or tenants as much as £1.3bn each year.

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy published its Building Energy Efficiency Survey results earlier this week, based on the 2014 to 2015 non-domestic building stock.

The survey found that the total stock in England and Wales, which comprised of more than 1.8 million buildings, consumed a total of 161,060GWh of energy each year. Of that figure, 53 per cent (84,820GWh) was electrical and the rest non-electrical.

Crucially BEIS found that as much as 63,160GWh of that total energy consumption could have been avoided through the adoption of energy efficiency technologies. More than a third of those potential savings could also have been abated through measures with payback periods of three years or less, representing possible bill savings of £1.3bn.

Measures with the greatest potential savings were carbon and energy management systems, lighting replacement and control, and building services instrumentation and control measures which combined represented more than half of the total savings potential.

This tallies with the most common end uses of energy, which included space heating, internal lighting, catering and cooled storage, which were responsible for 70 per cent of energy consumption. Electrical energy was commonly used to power internal lighting, cooled storage and ICT equipment.

But while the potential for efficiency savings was undoubted, a large number of barriers were also identified by those who participated in the survey. Economic barriers were the most prevalent, including restricted access to capital, perceived hidden costs within investments and external risks.

A number of organisational barriers were also referenced. Complex chains of decision making was a barrier mentioned frequently, corresponding with the results of similar surveys which have found that decision making processes have prohibited energy efficiency investments from going ahead in a number of businesses.

Source: Energyzine

Chancellors new home promise

Accreditation bodies have welcomed a commitment by Government to build another 140,000 homes, which should produce welcome new work for OCDEA-qualified domestic assessors.

The commitment was made by Chancellor Philip Hammond (left) in his Autumn Statement to the House of Commons yesterday, and was welcomed by both Elmhurst Energy and Stroma Certification.

The Chancellor announced in his statement a £2.3bn housing infrastructure fund designed to help provide 100,000 new homes in high-demand areas, and £1.4bn to deliver 40,000 extra affordable homes.

This is understood to be in addition to £4.7bn announced previously by Government as part of its commitment to build a million homes before the end of this parliament, though some might recall similar promises of large numbers of new homes from then Chancellor George Osborne in his Autumn Statement in 2014.

Local authorities will be able to bid for the money just announced under one of three existing schemes – Affordable Rent, Shared Ownership or Rent to Buy.

Stroma Technical Manager Andy Parkin said: “We welcome the Chancellor’s Autumn Statement announcement regarding the extra investment in new homes and affordable new homes.

“This presents a great opportunity of extra assessment revenue for our OCDEA members. The UK is still seeing demand for new homes outstripping supply and after seeing previous governments make similar commitments to new build housing, it will be interesting to see if this is delivered.”

Elmhurst Energy Managing Director Martyn Reed said: “We are delighted that the Chancellor accepts that new housing is a priority, which will be welcome news for both our On-Construction members and, because of the domino effect that new housing has on existing dwellings, for Domestic Energy Assessors too.

“Elmhurst Energy will continue to push that all new homes are designed and built to be as energy efficient as possible.

“Government statistics show that the new houses built last year will produce 7% less carbon dioxide, meaning that they will perform better than ever, but the removal of the zero carbon homes commitment, and no new Building Regulations on the horizon, means that the Government is missing its greatest opportunity to deliver on its Paris 2015 commitment.”

However Sue Coleman, Chair of West Country assessors’ group DCHI, was uncertain how useful this would be for her and her members.

She told EAM: “More new homes is always good news but probably not for us independent SAP assessors who would love the chance to work with bigger developers but they tend to have their own in house, or sub out to ‘panel’ type companies. The hamsters will be under pressure to make the wheel turn even faster.”

Another measure announced by Mr Hammond which may prove controversial was his proposal to scrap lettings agents’ fees, which caused the shares of major estate agents to tumble on the stock markets yesterday afternoon.

The proposal would not directly affect assessors, but many DEAs who are used to working with lettings agents could find themselves having to work direct with landlords instead, though it’s by no means clear how any legislation would work.

However this is a proposal, and no doubt lettings agents will be lobbying government hard to get it scrapped, but they could face stiff resistance since a similar measure has been in force in Scotland for some time.

Source: Energy assessor magazine

Continuation of energy efficiency fund gives Northern Ireland boost

Firms in Northern Ireland that want to purchase energy efficient equipment to cut costs and reduce the environmental impact of commercial energy consumption can continue to access Invest Northern Ireland’s 0% APR Energy Efficiency Loan Fund for at least two more years.

Following an independent review of the scheme’s success over the past 13 years and a competitive tender, the Carbon Trust has been awarded a new contract by Invest NI to extend the loans scheme.

Loans are provided to support businesses that are looking to replace their out of date and inefficient equipment, or that want to invest in renewables.

“Staying competitive in an increasingly challenging market is going to become a bigger priority for businesses in Northern Ireland. With our help, there are costs businesses can reduce without impacting their productivity”, according to Abigail Hermon, Head of Loans at the Carbon Trust.

Businesses in Northern Ireland can borrow between £3,000 and £400,000 to fund their project, at zero interest. Loans are designed so that in most cases the monthly savings on energy bills should exceed the monthly repayments, with the repayment term being between one and four years.

One business that has benefitted from an energy efficiency loan was Beverage Plastics in Craigavon. The company was able to install a new injection moulding machine, which saved them 55 per cent on their energy bills in just six months and will create an estimated reduction in carbon emissions of 700 tonnes a year.

Source: Energyzine

BEIS LAUNCHES SAP CONSULTATION

A ten-week consultation on changes to new-build domestic software the Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP) has been launched by the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.

The consultation was published last Thursday (17 November) and will be open until 31 January 2017.

SAP is used to assess compliance of new homes with Part L of the Building Regulations, though this update is not linked to changes in Building Regulations, and also supports the delivery of government renewables policies such as the RHI and Feed in Tariff.

BEIS said details of the update set out twenty areas of the SAP methodology which are under review, and on which it is inviting comments.

Accreditation body Elmhurst Energy, which has provided a briefing note for its members, said the consultation asks for views on key areas of interest, such as the carbon emission factors for grid electricity and other fuels used to supply energy to dwellings, and the distribution loss factor for heat networks.

The consultation paper presents provisional carbon emission factors and primary energy factors which are to be used in the 2016 version of SAP and also for SBEM, the compliance calculation tool for non-domestic buildings.

Draft specifications for the new version of SAP, and a comparison with the current version, are available on the BRE website at http://www.bre.co.uk/sap2016/page.jsp?id=3618 and a draft version of the new software, dubbed cSAP, is also available there.

Comments on the proposed changes should be fed-back via BEIS’s official consultation link at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/public-consultation-on-proposals-to-amend-the-standard-assessment-procedure-sap

SAP2012 will continue to be used during the consultation process and until SAP2016 is finalised and implemented.

Source: Energy assessor magazine

New homes fuel bills cut by half

A new home built to the latest building regulations can cost half as much to heat as a Victorian house of the same size, according to a report published yesterday by the NHBC Foundation, the research arm of construction standards body the National House Building Council.

‘The advantages of new homes’ was based on a survey of 2,000 people who had recently moved into a new home and were asked what they considered the advantages of new homes to be.

Many of the people surveyed pointed to the energy efficiency benefits of new homes, with the better standards of insulation, enhanced draught-proofing, and improved ‘airtightness’ which can help to lower household annual energy bills and improve levels of comfort.

The report said that energy bills were expected to be around £440 lower in a modern one-bedroom ground floor flat compared to its Victorian equivalent, and for a new build four-bedroom detached house bills were estimated at £1,050, saving £1,400 compared to those of a nineteenth century house.

Homeowners of newer properties were also drawn to the idea of buying a ‘blank-canvas’ ready to be personalised, free from the nasty surprises of previous owners’ DIY, and they also commented positively on the contemporary, flexible layouts and modern facilities of new homes, such as new kitchens, bathrooms and appliances, covered by manufacturers’ warranties.

The report outlines the safety advantages of new homes raised by some respondents, such as mains-powered smoke alarms, interlinked throughout the home, which are standard, and the benefits of safety glazing, safer stairs and the additional security features.

But the report added that the advantages of new homes extend beyond the front door and many of the new homeowners surveyed considered that moving to a new development of like-minded people was also an attraction, allowing the opportunity to make new friends and neighbours in a new community.

Neil Smith (left), Head of Research & Innovation at NHBC, said: “It is pleasing that homeowners are able to identify the many benefits of new homes, ranging from the obvious advantages of a ‘blank canvas’ with everything being new, through to the much-improved energy efficiency standards, which lead to greatly-reduced fuel bills, compared with those of older homes.

“Maybe less obvious are the more solid foundations on which new homes are built, which are designed to suit local ground conditions, as well as the safety advantages of modern wiring and mains-powered smoke alarms, interlinked throughout the home.

“This report is a useful reminder of the benefits of buying a new home, designed and built in accordance with up-to-date standards. What’s more, an important advantage frequently raised in the survey is the peace of mind provided by NHBC’s warranty and insurance protection under Buildmark, from exchange of contracts through to a maximum of 10 years after completion.”

To download the report go to https://www.nhbcfoundation.org/publication/the-advantages-of-new-homes/

Source: Energy assessor magazine

ESOS may have passed, but its message needs reinforcing

It’s almost a year since the first compliance date for the Energy Savings Opportunity Scheme. Robin Hale, director of the Energy Services and Technology Association (ESTA), examines why there is a greater need to reinforce the message.

The Energy Savings Opportunity Scheme (ESOS) has, for those of us in the energy community, been ‘done to death’. From articles on legislation, to presentations from assessors and more recently discussions with the Environment Agency ‘compliance enforcers’, it seems difficult to understand why there are those who are still non-compliant.

With the anniversary of the first compliance date fast approaching, this round of ESOS for the most part should be well and truly in the rear view mirror. But with the referendum, silence (to date) on the business energy tax reform and a need to frame the business case for energy efficiency correctly, projects identified in audits still abound and are waiting to be implemented. Add to this the impact of reorganisations and revised strategies, then the need for the energy industry to continually reinforce ‘the ESOS message’ becomes more apparent.

As part of BRE’s briefing papers supported by ESTA, a free to download guide, ‘Gaining value from ESOS audits’ has been published. This guide provides not only a solid overview of the ‘why and how’ of ESOS, but also considers the opportunities and recommendations being identified in buildings, industry and transport.

From building audits, many of the recommendations are based on making the current systems (heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting) more efficient and in industrial locations includes the efficiency of manufacturing systems as well as the operation of the equipment.

In terms of industrial processes, key recommendations identified from ESOS audits could include installing higher efficiency motors or variable speed drives, use of heat recovery, more efficient lighting and building controls and building management systems.

In all scenarios however, a good understanding of the energy use within an organisation is needed, which is usually through a sub-metering monitoring and targeting solution (M&T), which is preferably automated. Where permanent meters have not been installed, Portable meters can be used to measure the actual energy use for some equipment and help to establish a base load profile. Without metering of the various operational stages and an understanding of a whole cycle of operation, you cannot develop a complete picture; and reviewing the entire process from start to finish is critical for the right savings to be made.

It is important that businesses consider and take maximum advantage of the ESOS audit reports to help reduce their overall organisational energy consumption and manage risk to the business.

As an example, a recent ESOS audit of the RSA Insurance Group identified estimated annual savings of £81,277 for their buildings. This included measures such as lighting replacement, improved building energy management system (BEMS) controls, employee engagement and the installation of renewable energy.

Although we haven’t touched on Transport in this article, the same Group identified cost savings of £191,108 which could be delivered through initiatives including the introduction of minimum vehicle standards for grey fleet and hire cars and investment in ‘smarter driving’ training.

As time ticks on and we begin to roll towards consideration of the next audit, there is an opportunity to plan and identify all of the options generated from this compliance exercise: i.e. which route should be taken and more importantly that this should be viewed as an integral part of an energy strategy, rather than the view previously taken that this is additional short term compliance reporting.

Key to the next stage will be benchmarking; for some this will highlight progression, the path to a more efficient use of energy and understanding that any investment made should be beneficial to the business, not just in financial terms, but also social and environmentally.

Source: Energyzine

Most SMEs want renewables commitment from energy supplier

A significant majority of small and medium-sized businesses (SMEs) want their energy supplier to be more committed to renewable energy, according to a new report.

The report, which looks at how the SME sector regards energy supply, revealed that while 72 per cent say they would like energy suppliers to be more committed to renewables, only 11 per cent would rate their current energy supplier as excellent when it comes to renewable energy support and options.

Almost three-quarters (73 per cent) of SMEs label value for money as a main priority; a figure that increases to 94 per cent for SMEs with between 5-25 employees. However just 23 per cent believe they are receiving an excellent deal, with the study claiming that relatively few businesses actually switch to a new supplier.

Jonathan Kini, Chief Executive of Haven Power, states that although the amount of SMEs that are dissatisfied with their existing energy supplier is perhaps unsurprising, the sheer scale of the discontent revealed in this report remains shocking.

“SMEs want more from their supplier and a commitment to renewable energy is one of the demands they are pushing for. This suggests there is some fundamental change happening, and we in the energy sector need to respond to it by not only helping SMEs reduce their energy usage but also being able to supply 100 per cent renewable energy,” he said.

“The fact that only 21 per cent of respondents believe their supplier is completely committed to renewable energy and almost a third saying their supplier is either not very committed or they are not sure they have a renewable option shows a huge gap in the market for those with a different offer.

“This research is something of a wake-up call to many in the energy supply sector. It tells us what SMEs want in terms of renewable energy options, and what they expect from their supplier to help them achieve their goals of greener energy and lower usage.”

71 per cent of SMEs agree that it should be simpler to switch supplier, while one in five companies who tried to switch did not end up with a new supplier.

The report argues that the third factor that is likely to stimulate a switch, after price and service, is the offer of renewable electricity, with 22 per cent of businesses telling researchers that they would stay late at work to switch suppliers if they could purchase a completely clean energy product. The figure rises to 28 per cent for the largest-sized SMEs with 101-250 employees.

In addition, 26 per cent of SMEs cite that support in being more energy efficient is something that they look for in an energy supplier.

Source: Energy assessor magazine

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